Equally yoked dating

Rated 3.98/5 based on 569 customer reviews

Precisely because of the biblical admonition expressed in 2 Corinthians 6, she had already broken up with her Catholic boyfriend. Ann wanted advice from me on how to give an answer for the nuptial hope within her.

I had two objectives: I wanted the gospel to illumine her decision to end the relationship and also to enrich her perspective on what it will look like to one day accept a man's proposal for marriage.

Following Christ is the most important decision you'll ever make. Choosing a mate who shares your faith and who will support you in your spiritual growth.

In 2 Corinthians , the Apostle Paul says that believers should not "be unequally yoked with non-believers." While it's true that this passage does not specifically mention marriage, it does refer to being bound in a relationship with another person—no relationship is more binding than marriage.

Starting with the first, I affirmed that it is possible for Catholics to be born-again Christians who love Jesus and genuinely seek to serve him.

In the words of Philip Ryken: Sometimes we forget that Luther, Calvin, and the rest of the Reformers were born and bred within the Roman church.

Ann's situation turned out to be simpler than most. ” Apparently, the man whom Ann was dating didn't understand why their relationship was terminal.I told Ann, “You want a guy who is a man of the Word, who is captivated by the triune God.Someone whose life is defined by redemptive grace from top to bottom, who embodies it, proclaims it, and understands his marital calling in terms shepherding you by this grace.At a Wheaton College dialogue with Timothy George that I moderated, Frank Beckwith was asked how to think about a Catholic and Protestant relationship en route to marriage.Frank's answer (from a Catholic perspective) was extremely helpful.

Leave a Reply