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A significant moment in candy history occured at the 1851 Great Exhibition in London, where "French-style" candies with rich cream centers were first displayed...

But it was the discovery of milk chocolate in Switzerland in 1875 that made the American candy bar such a phenomenon of the late nineteenth century." ---Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F. 54-5) [NOTE: This source has much more information than can be paraphrased. It also contains separate entries for specific types of candies.] Recommended reading The general concensus of newspaper articles and Web sites place the origin of "sponge candy" in upstate New York. We find much information about the current product but scant details regarding the history of the recipe.

While the British called such confections, "sweetmeats," Americans came to call "candy," from the Arabic qandi, "made of sugar," although one finds "candy" in English as early as the fifteenth century...

Caramels were known in the early eighteenth century and lollipops by the 1780s..."Hard candies" made from lemon or peppermint flavors were popular in the early nineteenth century...

"It's something I don't think exists in other parts of the country," said William Long... Long knows of only three small companies in Buffalo that make the melt-in-your-mouth mixture of corn syrup, sugar, water, gelatin, baking soda and chocolate..."Usually the only place you see it in Central New York is in a retail shop,"... " Laura Mason, British confectionery history expert, explains: "The anamolies in our own language are due to the origin of sweets or sweeties..diminutives of sweetmeat. Cresseid (Charteris) 420 in Poems (1981) 124 The sweit meitis seruit in plaittis clene With saipheron sals of ane gude sessoun. Young Thomas Edison was a candy butcher servicing railroad passengers. We have no details regarding how these shops operated or what they looked like.

While whipping up a batch shortly before Christmas, Stone's owner...said, "Some people comapre the taste to malted milk balls, but it's not quite like that... Without stirring, cook over medium heat to 300 degrees F. This word, still not entirely obsolete, was in common use for over 400 years to the end of the nineteenth century. Were they, in fact, set up to emulate traditional butcher shops selling novel "meat" shaped confections? Reply: September 19, 2004 - Here's what Joe Mc Kennon has to say about it in Circus Lingo - "Candy Butcher: Concession salesman who sells concession items on the circus seats before and during a performance.

Ask your librarian to help you find a copy.] "Candy...

Indeed, the first candies were sugar coated nuts, seeds and fruits.

Next morning, the "heart" of the mix is coated with a 1/45-inch thick swirl of wood-hard candy..."It's impossible for someone to make a small batch at home because the tough hide would swallow the tender core...[the candymaker] cuts the core int o 1-by-1 inch squares...[and them] takes the squares to the "enrobing room," where they are dressed in either light or dark chocolate... Your local public librarian can help you obtain a copy. (and sing.) Sweet food, as sugared cakes or pastry, confectionary (obs.); preserved or candied fruits, sugared nuts, etc.; also, globules, lozenges, drops, or sticks made of sugar with fruit or other flavouring or filling; sing. Hawking merchandise such as candies, peanuts, drinks, etc., is like butchering meat.

Sponge candy is one of 33 recipes Raymond Stone passed along with the store, Stone, who started making candy in his basement in 1940, died several years ago." ---"Move Over, Candy Bars: Sponge candy 'Eats like a Million Bucks'," Scott Scanlon, Post-Standard (Syracuse NY), January 8, 1992 (Accent, P. The Oxford English Dictionary dates first the print reference to sweetmeats to the 16th century and defines it thusly: "1. Cutting a carcass into pieces and putting it on a tray.

When the mixture bubbles to 293 degrees, the copper bowl is removed from a gas-fired stove and gelatin is added. This comprehensive catalog with instructions exemplifies the time when British and American confectionery were one in the same. The Webster's New World Dictionary of the American Language defines "Candy Butcher" as selling confections and newspapers on trains.

In exactly 90 seconds, baking soda is added, turning the mix from a dark tan to a light gold..mixture [put] "to sleep" overnight in 2-foot-by-4 foot metal boxes...called "coffins." [the candymaker] covers the boxes with blankets. This book is readily available; published as Martha Washington's Booke of Cookery, transcribed by Karen Hess, Columbia University Press ISBN 0231049315. As for being attributed to a butcher hired between 18 on the John Robinson Circus, it is a matter of conjecture.

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